Kathe Burkhart

The Liz Taylor Series: Selections from 1983-2007

May 16 – June 23, 2007

The Liz Taylor Series: Selections from 1983 – 2007 (2007)
Installation view
Alexander Gray Associates

The Liz Taylor Series: Selections from 1983 – 2007 (2007)
Installation view
Alexander Gray Associates

The Liz Taylor Series: Selections from 1983 – 2007 (2007)
Installation view
Alexander Gray Associates

The Liz Taylor Series: Selections from 1983 – 2007 (2007)
Installation view
Alexander Gray Associates

The Liz Taylor Series: Selections from 1983 – 2007 (2007)
Installation view
Alexander Gray Associates

The Liz Taylor Series: Selections from 1983 – 2007 (2007)
Installation view
Alexander Gray Associates

No Fucking Way: from the Liz Taylor Series (Who's Afraid of Viriginia Woolf) (2006)
Acrylic and mixed media on canvas
90h x 60w in (228.6h x 152.4w cm)

Blueballs: from the Liz Taylor Series (Cat on a Hot Tin Roof) (2007)
Acrylic and mixed media on canvas
72h x 108w in (182.88h x 274.32w cm)

Cockteaser: from the Liz Taylor Series (Giant) (2006)
Acrylic and mixed media on canvas
108h x 72w in (274.32h x 182.88w cm)

Romance/Restraint (Left: Paparazzi Shot, Right: Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?) (1983)
Acrylic and mixed media on canvas
Diptych; 75h x 98w in (190.5h x 248.92w cm)

Sit on It: from the Liz Taylor Series (The Girl Who Had Everything) (1999)
Acrylic and composition leaf on canvas
76h x 132w in (193.04h x 335.28w cm)

Up Your Ass: from the Liz Taylor Series (Cleopatra) (2006)
Acrylic and mixed media on canvas
90h x 60w in (228.6h x 152.4w cm)

Press Release

Alexander Gray Associates

Elizabeth Taylor’s multiple personae–actress, vixen, Hollywood royalty, serial wife and divorcée, party girl, charitable humanitarian, entrepreneur, rebel, dominant woman–acts as a media-based mirror of contemporary female identity. For Kathe Burkhart, Taylor becomes a doppelganger in her paintings, in which tabloid, paparazzi shots and publicity stills from Taylor’s films are emblazoned with profanities that reclaim female sexuality and power. “I locate my position as oppositional on several levels: as a critique of representation, particularly that of women and also as a rupturing of idiomatic packaging/presentation devices,” notes the artist.