Ricardo Brey

Annex

2003–2016

Untitled, 2003
Transfer, oil and handmade paper on cardboard
19.6h x 25.6w in (50h x 65w cm)

Plutonic Rocks, 2003
Transfer, pencil, oil, wire, tape and handmade paper on cardboard Arches
19.6h x 25.6w in ( 50h x 65w cm)

Kouros, 2012
Clay, wood, cloth, trinket, whistles, buttons rope, lead, iron
29.92h x 12.59w x 18.50d in (76h x 32w x 47d cm)

Untitled, 2003–2008
Transfer, pencil, gouache, ink, pigment gris des ardennes, tape and handmade paper on cardboard BFK Rives Arches
22h x 29.9w in (56h x 76w cm)

Untitled, 2004
Transfer, oil, pencil, ink, handmade paper and straw on carboard Arches
19.6h x 25.6w in (50h x 65w cm)

Kouros, 2012
Clay, wood, iron, jute, rope, tea bag, glass beads, bell 
24.40h x 24.40w x 12.59d in  (62h x 62w x 32d cm)

Cabezas, 2007
Transfer, pencil, ink, acrylic, tape wood, and transparent paper on cardboard Arches
19.6h x 25.6w in (50h x 65w cm)

Untitled, 2003
Transfer, oil, ink, Kassel earth pigment, laser print and handmade paper on cardboard
25.6h X 19.6w in (65h x 50w cm)

Untitled, 2003
Transfer, oil and handmade paper on cardboard
19.6h x 25.6w in (50h x 65w cm)

Untitled, 2003
Transfer, oil and handmade paper on cardboard
19.6h x 25.6w in (50h x 65w cm)

Untitled, 2003
Transfer, oil, pencil, ink, acrylic, Kassel earth pigment and handmade paper on cardboard
19.5h x 25.6w in (50h x 65w cm)

Description

A complimentary body of work to Ricardo Brey’s earlier Universe (2002—2006), Annex (2003—2016) originally began as an exploration of flight. Consisting of works on paper, sculptures, installations, and videos, the series primarily focuses on birds, but also features flying insects and plants, as well as angels. As the curator and writer Roel Arkestijn observes, “Completely in line with his previous work, flying is for Brey a mythic activity that is bound up with migration and existential questions about freedom and our origins. The Annex forces us to recall Brey’s sculptures on the theme of Icarus.” As part of Annex, Brey also produced a series of carved bird head sculptures made from balsa wood and clay, the Kouros. Combining observations on the natural world with myth, Brey draws parallels between the two, suggesting that attempts to categorize reality’s complexity ultimately results in the construction of scientific fictions.