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Teresa Burga

Perfil de la Mujer Peruana

Perfil de la Mujer Peruana- Propuesta II (Perfil Professional), 1981/2017

Perfil de la Mujer Peruana- Propuesta II (Perfil Professional), 1981/2017
Quipu
59.1h x 55.1w x 11d in (150h x 140w x 28d cm)

Perfil de la mujer peruana, 1980

Perfil de la mujer peruana, 1980
Charcoal on paper
15h × 10.2w in (38h × 26w cm)

Perfil de la Mujer Peruana (Uterus), 2017

Perfil de la Mujer Peruana (Uterus), 2017
Ceramic 
11.81h x 25.6w x 5.12d in (30h x 65w x 13d cm)

Perfil de la Mujer Peruana- Perfil Antropométrico y fisiológico, 2017, Mannequin and glass cube

Perfil de la Mujer Peruana- Perfil Antropométrico y fisiológico, 2017

Mannequin and glass cube

74.8h x 39.4w x 39.4d in (190h x 100w x 100d cm)

Perfil de la Mujer Peruana- Propuesta II (Perfil Social), 1981/2017

Perfil de la Mujer Peruana- Propuesta II (Perfil Social), 1981/2017
Scales, stainless steel, wood and paint
Dimensions variable 

Perfil de la Mujer Peruana- Propuesta II (Perfil Religioso), 1981/2017

Perfil de la Mujer Peruana- Propuesta II (Perfil Religioso), 1981/2017
Two glass bowls with water and salt 
39.4h x 33.5w x 17.7d in (100h x 85x x 45d cm)

Perfil de la Mujer Peruana- Perfil Político, 1980-2017, Voting box, acrylic box, and colored paper

Perfil de la Mujer Peruana- Perfil Político, 1980-2017

Voting box, acrylic box, and colored paper

17.91h x 106.3w x 31.5d in (45.5h x 270w x 80d cm)

Description

In 1980, following the return to democracy after the military regime of General Alvarado, Burga embarked on an ambitious large-scale research project, Perfil de la Mujer Peruana (Profile of the Peruvian Woman), exhibited at Banco Continental, Lima, Peru. In collaboration with sociologist Marie-France Cathelat, Burga surveyed 290 middle-class women in Lima about various aspects of their social and physical identities, including height, weight, religion, political affiliations, among other categories. The data collected was organized into twelve “profiles:” physiological, psychological, social, educational, cultural, religious, professional, economic, etc.. To display their statistical findings, Burga employed the use of various conceptual and sculptural tools: a mannequin, a jigsaw puzzle, and  variousseveral anatomical drawings. In 2017, Burga revisited the project and was able to realize physical models to further illustrate her original findings from 1980. Among these objects are an abacus, various ballot boxes, glass containers of holy water and salt, and a contemporary quipu (based on the ancient Incan counting device made of threaded knots). Due to the cultural climate in Peru in the early 80s, the original presentation of this large-scale project was met with relatively brief critical attention, but as curator Kalliopi Minioudaki explains, Burga was ahead of her time: “As a collaborative, interdisciplinary project that engaged the local community and institutions, raised awareness, and envisioned change, it brought her work as close as it ever came to feminist social practice.”